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Making-of

Silk & Spices

4 minutes

NATURAL AND URBAN, ELEGANT AND EXTRAVAGANT, TIMELESS AND BRAVE: THE SILK & SPICES COLLECTION FASCINATES WITH CONTRASTS. TEXTILE DESIGNER SIBYLLE AEBERHARD ABOUT CRÉATION BAUMANN’S REFRESHING HOMAGE TO TEXTILE TRADITION.

The SILK & SPICES collection lends stylish homes a timeless, yet surprisingly textile air. World-class materials with tranquil colours and distinct designs. How did this interplay of classic elegance and fresh ideas develop in Création Baumann’s Langenthal studio? We asked textile designer Sibylle Aeberhard, in charge of creating the fabric, to tell us the story. Find inspiration from this insight into the creative textile process.

WHAT BRINGS THE SILK & SPICES COLLECTION TO LIFE IS ITS PLAY WITH TEXTILE CONTRASTS. WHAT HAS INSPIRED YOU TO THIS PLAYFULNESS?

The need for variety is a recurring theme when designing a collection. Contrasts create suspense, adding to the attractiveness of the entire collection. This applies to materials, textures and designs. I am inspired all the time when I’m collecting ideas. One of the goals is that the fabrics have to work independently while providing a coherent overall appearance. To ensure that the whole remains harmonious despite all of its differences, the contrasts need to use the same technique.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE CREATIVE PROCESS FROM FIRST IDEA TO COMPLETE FABRIC IN A FEW WORDS?

We start—plainly—with the task, followed by research. Initially, this research is quite analytical and involves the market, sales, competitors. I try to get a feel for the topic, to find out why it fascinates me, and what is in the air, resulting in moodboards with colours and designs. The draft stage is about researching technical implementation options, choosing materials, composing the colours and defining the design. The key is then to summarise everything, by balancing distinct ideas and an open creative process.

ARTEMISIA

ARTEMISIA

DANDY

DANDY

RAMIN

RAMIN

VASCO

VASCO

TURMALIN II

TURMALIN II

ARTEMISIA

ARTEMISIA

WHAT QUALITIES ARE REQUIRED IN A TEXTILE DESIGNER TO ACHIEVE THE AIMS IN THIS WAY?

Curiosity, openness, a desire to experiment and — time allowing — a willingness to break new ground. It is challenging to have the conceptual framework in mind while taking creative liberties time and again. This is a balancing act which sometimes becomes a bit chaotic but always has to be analytical.

DEVELOPING TEXTILES IS TEAMWORK. WHAT ARE THE CHARACTERISTICS OF GOOD TEAMWORK?

What you need in any case is an open and critical exchange. Ideally, it is a mutual process between people who inspire and support each other because they enjoy what they do and are passionate about it, with a common goal of succeeding with their product.

THE COLLECTION IS A HOMAGE TO THE PAST. DID YOU NEED TRADITIONAL EXPERTISE?

In terms of techniques there was a certain requirement. Warp print, jacquard, embroidery—these are traditional techniques. It is about knowing which technique to use to systematically achieve the desired—in the case of SILK & SPICES, the contemporary—creative expression, nodding to the textile tradition while breaking new ground.

ORFEO

ORFEO

RAMIN

RAMIN

DORIN

DORIN

VASCO

VASCO

VASCO

VASCO

VICTOR

VICTOR

DANDY

DANDY

FEELING AND DISCOVERING WHY THE TOPIC FASCINATES YOU AND HAVING AN INKLING OF WHAT IS IN THE AIR—THAT HAS AN INSPIRING EFFECT.

Sibylle Aeberhard
ARTEMISIA

ARTEMISIA

VASCO

VASCO

HOW DID YOU ACHIEVE THE CONSISTENT INTERACTION OF COLOUR, SHAPE AND MATERIAL THAT IS SILK & SPICES’ CHARACTERISTIC FEATURE?

Whether materiality, playing with the matte-shine effect, the design or the colours—you always have to ask yourself what fits in where. If I want to bring colour into the collection I need to see where it is harmonious so that it works on its own and within the collection. This means trying and testing, composing, letting go and discarding—an intuitive process.

ARTEMISIA IS AN EXCITING LIAISON BETWEEN PRINTING AND WOVEN TECHNOLOGY. WAS THIS ALSO A TECHNICAL CHALLENGE?

Yes, it was. With this fabric we need to prolong the point where warp print and jacquard overlap. The pattern must spread evenly. We don’t want an accumulation of flowers in one place and emptiness in another. This is about technical refinements that need proper planning. The finish also plays an important role, in particular the feel of the material.

HOW DO YOU, THE TEXTILE DESIGNER, HANDLE THE LIMITATIONS OF WHAT IS POSSIBLE?

As a textile designer you hit limitations all the time, for example, when it is impossible for technical reasons to realise your ideas the way you want to have them. But to me, limitations are not necessarily negative. They guide you and provide a framework inside which you are looking for the optimum. Over time you learn what works and what doesn’t.

DORIN

DORIN

MAIRA

MAIRA

DAPHNE

DAPHNE

DOES THE COLLECTION’S RESULT MATCH WHAT YOU HAD IN MIND AT THE BEGINNING?

From the start I wanted the collection that would cite the textile tradition while positioning itself with utmost self-confidence in the here and now. In that respect we succeeded. Sure, at the start you were also keen on other ideas but weren’t able to realise them—but we are getting the boldness, the freshness across, and that was important to me.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT TO YOU AS A TEXTILE DESIGNER?

When the fabrics are well received by the market and sell. But that comes right at the end, when I am already embroiled in my next project. When, during the development process, I feel that we are doing something that is consistent, that works, then that is a compliment of equal importance to me.

THE BIG CHALLENGE OF FABRIC CREATION IS HAVING A CLEAR GOAL IN MIND WHILE TAKING CREATIVE LIBERTIES TIME AND AGAIN.

Sibylle Aeberhard
MAIRA

MAIRA

DALIA

DALIA

TURMALIN II

TURMALIN II

RAINA

RAINA

VASCO

VASCO

DAPHNE

DAPHNE

SIBYLLE AEBERHARD

Sibylle Aeberhard has been creative for Création Baumann since 2004. The textile designer cut her cloth early: As a child, she already sewed clothes for her dolls and for herself. Since fashion is too short-lived in her opinion, she was thrilled more and more by the basic textile element. What Sibylle Aeberhard—who graduated from the Zurich textile specialist class and was influenced by her mentor, Bärbel Birkelbach—likes about her job is the mix of handicraft, creative design and technical know-how.


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